BRITAIN AND THE UNITED STATES RESTART THE COLD WAR WITH RUSSIA

PETER'S NEW YORK - June 18, 2007 --  It's quite obvious that Bush and his counterpart in Britain are moving toward a conflict with Russia. They have been working on this for quite a while, but now the hostility, which those two nations have provoked, is obvious for all to see. The question that each of us must ask is, "Why?" Because there is a reason, so deliberate have these provocations been.

The latest is Britain's insistence that Russia extradite one of its citizens who is accused of a rather bizarre murder involving an isotope of polonium, the element discovered by the Polish scientists Marie Curie and which was named after her home country. Apparently, the element is, under certain circumstances very poisonous, although I would find it hard to understand why it would become the poison of choice for an assassination.

The victim was some fellow whose name I cannot pronounce (Alexander Litvinenko), who was Russian but who emigrated to Great Britain. Putin was supposedly after him because he was one of those pseudo-democratic reformers in Russia, but in reality probably on the British intelligence payroll. After having supposedly investigated the matter, Britain has accused another Russia, former KGB agent Andrei Lugovoi (another one of those hard-to-pronounce names),  of committing the crime. [Can't we all just agree to stick with the names Vladimir and Natasha as the Russian spies?)  Apparently, they traced radiation from the element to various people and locations, and then said that this other guy that did it.

Britain is insisting that Russia turn the guy over to them, and Russia, quite naturally, is saying "No." They claim that by their constitution, they cannot extradite. This somehow makes sense. Britain could forward the evidence to the Russian authorities, and they could take it from there. But that would not suite the purpose of this elaborate scheme. So in retaliation for not handing this fellow over, Britain has sent four of Russia's diplomats packing. Does it not remind one of the US demands for the Taliban in Afghanistan to hand over Osama Bin Laden, and when the Taliban asked why, and asked that evidence be provided, the US just invaded the country. What new pretext -- and for what? -- is being designed for Russia here?

The entire affair looks like a scenario dreamed up by British intelligence, and the accused Russian,
Lugovoi, has said as much. The use of polonium smacks of a CIA-style concoction, in much the same way as the so-called "dirty bomb" is a fiction made up by the American intelligence agencies, whipped up as another way to accuse people of terrorism. The so-called "shoe-bomber<" who probably never intended to bomb anything, was at first accused of plotting to explode a "dirty bomb," but those charges were.....dropped....I wonder why?

It's because there is no such thing as a dirty bomb except in academia or in the plethora of security-oriented nonprofits and in the CIA. So with polonium..

It has become obvious that Britain wants to pick a fight, and they are using this polonium case to do so.

The United States has been trying to pick a fight with Russia for years. Vladimir Putin, Russia's new hero and very rightly so, noticed that the nonprofit organizations that had proliferated throughout Russia supposedly fighting for democracy were no more than spy agencies, interfering with elections and other internal matters. He therefore put restrictions on their operation, and banned some of them from operating altogether.

It is, I hope, no secret that the United States has been using nonprofits  for ages now to interfere with the internal affairs of countries and for intelligence gathering. That is why it is no longer safe to do work for them in foreign countries. If you are a journalist or working for a nonprofit, you are, and rightly so, almost automatically suspected of being an American spy.

So now, with Britain expelling Russia's diplomats, the situation of trying to isolate Russia and brand it as anti-democratic is reaching a critical juncture. Remember just a few weeks ago, the United States said it was going to put missiles in the countries bordering Russia, another provocative act. Russia said it would point missiles at Europe. Then, it has actually suspended its participation in a treaty as a result of Britain's highly provocative action. The question we must all ask, is, what is the objective of the runaway foreign policy of the United States, and its sidekick, Britain, and what can be done to stop it?

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